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The Way I See It!

I am an Ultra-Conservative, Alpha-Male, True Authentic Leader, Type "C" Personality, who is very active in my community; whether it is donating time, clothes or money for Project Concern or going to Common Council meetings and voicing my opinions. As a blogger, I intend to provide a different viewpoint "The way I see it!" on various world, national and local issues with a few helpful tips & tidbits sprinkled in.

Under God!

National, Culture

Court upholds 'under God' in Pledge of Allegiance

 

A federal appeals court in San Francisco has ruled that the phrase "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance is constitutional.

 

In a 2-1 ruling, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel rejected arguments by Sacramento atheist Michael Newdow that the phrase violates the separation between church and state.

 

In a separate ruling Thursday, the appeals court also upheld the use of the phrase "In God We Trust" on coins and currency.

 

What type of government does the United States of America have?

 

We have a Republic and are not a true democracy!

 

In its original form it read:

 

"I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

 

In 1923, the words, "the Flag of the United States of America" were added.  At this time it read:

 

"I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

 

In 1954, in response to the Communist threat of the times, President Eisenhower encouraged Congress to add the words "under God," creating the 31-word pledge we say today.

 

"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

 

Can someone show me where in the United States Constitution or the United States Bill of Rights it states, “separation of church and state”?

 

You will not find it, because it isn’t there!  That statement has never went through the ratification process nor did it get an amendment.

 

Virginia Plan was the unofficial agenda for the Convention, and was drafted chiefly by James Madison, considered to be "The Father of the Constitution" for his major contributions.

 

The phrase "separation of church and state" is derived from a letter written by Thomas Jefferson in 1802 to a group identifying themselves as the Danbury Baptists.  In that letter, referencing the First Amendment to the United States Constitution,

 

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

 

Jefferson writes:

 

Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between Man & his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legitimate powers of government reach actions only, & not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should "make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof," thus building a wall of separation between Church & State

 

It means that we should not have a state sponsored religion or prohibiting the free exercise of religion.

 

In a letter to James Hamilton, Governor of Pennsylvania, George Washington wrote, “I am, with all due respect and regard, your Honor's most obedient and very humble servant.”

 

Now taken out of context and applied to the meaning of servant, Was George Washington really James Hamilton’s servant?

 

So letters to and from our Founding Fathers if taken out of context is a very liberal and dangerous thing to do! 

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