NOW:53110:USA00949
http://widgets.journalinteractive.com/cache/JIResponseCacher.ashx?duration=5&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdata.wp.myweather.net%2FeWxII%2F%3Fdata%3D*USA00949
50°
H 50° L 37°
Cloudy | 20MPH

The Way I See It!

I am an Ultra-Conservative, Alpha-Male, True Authentic Leader, Type "C" Personality, who is very active in my community; whether it is donating time, clothes or money for Project Concern or going to Common Council meetings and voicing my opinions. As a blogger, I intend to provide a different viewpoint "The way I see it!" on various world, national and local issues with a few helpful tips & tidbits sprinkled in.

A Good Reason to Eat Your Broccoli

Health, Medical

While I love Broccoli, many on my friends do not like it.  My wife enjoys it with me and my daughter thinks they are neat looking small bushes, she will not eat it.  She screams if we try and give it to her.  My mother told me I was the same way, and then one day just started eating them.

 

Broccoli nudges genes to fight prostate cancer

Four extra servings a week was enough to boost benefits, study says

 

Source

 

Men, eat your broccoli to help fight prostate cancer.

 

According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer among American men.  Prostate cancer is even more common among African American men than white men, though the reason for this difference is not known.  European rates are lower than those in the United States, and the lowest rates have been observed in Asia.  These variations may be partially due to use of different diagnostic techniques or to currently unknown risk factors.

 

As men age, their chance of developing prostate cancer increases.  An estimated 8 out of 10 men diagnosed with prostate cancer are over age 65.  In fact, a large percentage of men who live long enough are likely to get prostate cancer.  According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), one third of all American men over age 50 have microscopic signs of prostate cancer.3 Furthermore, by age 75, 50 to 75 percent of American men will have cancerous changes in the prostate.3

 

Source

This site uses Facebook comments to make it easier for you to contribute. If you see a comment you would like to flag for spam or abuse, click the "x" in the upper right of it. By posting, you agree to our Terms of Use.

Page Tools