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The Way I See It!

I am an Ultra-Conservative, Alpha-Male, True Authentic Leader, Type "C" Personality, who is very active in my community; whether it is donating time, clothes or money for Project Concern or going to Common Council meetings and voicing my opinions. As a blogger, I intend to provide a different viewpoint "The way I see it!" on various world, national and local issues with a few helpful tips & tidbits sprinkled in.

Inductive Reasoning

Culture, Logic, Words

V. Characteristics of Inductive Reasoning

 

Unlike deductive reasoning, Inductive reasoning is not designed to produce mathematical certainty.  Induction occurs when we gather bits of specific information together and use our own knowledge and experience in order to make an observation about what must be true.  Inductive reasoning does not use syllogisms, but series of observations, in order to reach a conclusion.  Consider the following chains of observations:

 

Observation: John came to class late this morning.

Observation: John’s hair was uncombed.

Prior experience: John is very fussy about his hair.

Conclusion: John overslept

 

The reasoning process here is directly opposite to that used in deductive syllogisms.  Rather than beginning with a general principle (People who comb their hair wake up on time), the chain of evidence begins with an observation and then combines it with the strength of previous observations in order to arrive at a conclusion.

 

 

VI. Generalization

 

The most basic kind of inductive reasoning is called induction by enumeration, or, more commonly, generalization.  You generalize whenever you make a general statement (all salesmen are pushy) based on observations with specific members of that group (the last three salesmen who came to my door were pushy).  You also generalize when you make an observation about a specific thing based on other specific things that belong to the same group (my girlfriend’s cousin Ed is a salesman, so he will probably be pushy.)  When you use specific observations as the basis of a general conclusion, you are said to be making an inductive leap.

 

http://www.jerryprettyman.com/lawschool/TrialAdv/InductiveReasoning.htm

 

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